Culturally Significant Areas (CSA)

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Definition

Areas considered culturally significant by communities based on five criteria.[1]


Description

The concept helps planners and managers to take account of immaterial cultural values in MSP. CSAs are critical to the wellbeing and identity of a given community. Areas can be defined as culturally significant for various reasons and based on different value sets. Risk assessments can be carried out, and CSAs can be mapped. The approach is modelled on the EBSA principle for ecologically significant areas. It's a way of working with communities and applicable in diverse contexts.

.[2]

Oak soldersSmall.jpg


”Oak Soldiers” by Heikki Laaksonen (design), Ari Leppänen and Jukka Auervuolle. The statue is located at the culturally significant Katariina Seaside Park in Kotka, Finland. The statue of 28 figures of soldiers tells the story of the nearby Svensksund Sea Battle of 1790. The statues are made of oak from the sunken battleships and the material was donated by the Kymenlaakso Museum. ”Oak soldiers” provided one way to use respectfully massive amounts of oak raised from the sunken ships of the two sea battles of Svensksund during different decades. According to the Antiquities Act of 1963, a permission from the Finnish Heritage Agency and documentation is needed in order to raise objects from ship wrecks sunken over 100 hundred years ago. Photo: Sallamaria Tikkanen, Finnish Heritage Agency.

  1. More information: Gee, Kira et al 2017: Identifying culturally significant areas for marine spatial planning. In Ocean and Coastal Management 136 (2017):139-147.
  2. More information: Gee, Kira et al 2017: Identifying culturally significant areas for marine spatial planning. In Ocean and Coastal Management 136 (2017):139-147.