Land-sea interaction

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Definition

Structures, buildings or objects on land with a connection to the water, or vice versa. [1]


Description

For instance, landmarks have always played a vital role for navigation. Lighthouses also fall into the land-sea interaction category.

There is also a transcendent aspect to the land-sea interaction for coastal populations, as the land-sea dichotomy was also perceived as allegory of a procession of the deceased to the realm of the dead. For this reason it is assumed that particularly burials of the Neolithic and the Bronze Age - megaliths and burial mounds - are situated in close proximity to the sea. Other structures connected with the ritual landscape are also connected to coastal areas in particular, like stone maze symbols in Finland and Sweden.[2]

  1. C. Westerdahl, Contrasts of the maritime environment - possible implications in prehistory - A very short course of cognition in the ancient maritime cultural landscape, in H. Stebergløkken et al. (eds.) : 'Ritual landscapes and border within rock art research' (Oxford, 2015), pp. 141-154.
  2. C. Westerdahl, Contrasts of the maritime environment - possible implications in prehistory - A very short course of cognition in the ancient maritime cultural landscape, in H. Stebergløkken et al. (eds.) : 'Ritual landscapes and border within rock art research' (Oxford, 2015), pp. 141-154.